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Australia & New Zealand Babywearing Week People’s Blogger Choice Award

During Australia and New Zealand Babywearing Week a number of bloggers blogged about our celebration. Sharing is caring in our book, so we promised that each of them would be in the running to win our ‘People’s Blogger Choice’ and be rewarded with your choice of Ergobaby Carriers (valued up to $209).

Today we ask YOU to help us decide which of the bloggers should win their choice of Ergobaby carrier.

You can choose from Just for Daisy; Documenting Delight; Living Serenely and Inked in Colour.

Voting CLOSED

Small Print: Poll closes Wednesday, 12 December at 5.00pm EST. You can only vote once. The winning blog will be contacted within 14 days. Prizes may take up to 6 weeks to be dispatched (although we hope it will be a lot quicker).

WINNER ANNOUNCED: Inked in Colour.

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Local Event Coordinator Prizes Revealed

Where oh where have the days gone? It is almost summer and Christmas is on the horizon growing closer each day!! A HUGE thank you to everyone who has been patiently awaiting the announcement of each prize.

Each and every event host donated their time to their celebration to ensure it ran smoothly and was enjoyed by participants. A big congratulations to everyone – we can not wait to start preparations for 2013!

Today we announce our Local Event Coordinator Prizes. We have three (3) Ergobaby Petunia Pickle Bottom carriers to give away to other event hosts (non award winners) who we think stood out from the crowd.

This year our winners are:

Tracey Beaumont (Central West Babywearers)- who organised THREE events in rural NSW (Cowra, Young and Orange) to spread the love of babywearing travelling around 500km across the events. Now that is dedication!

Andrea Trout (Perth Babywearers)- organised two very successful events in Perth which welcomed two of the largest groups after the Brisbane Swap Meet event. This was   the first year that the Perth Babywearers joined the Australia and New Zealand Babywearing Week celebration.

Ellen McNally (Illawarra Babywearers)- despite localised flooding the day before, Illawarra Babywearers celebrated their day with a facepainter, wrapping demo’s and a try, feel and see station set up with wraps in all sizes, Ergobaby and Manduca SSC, Mei Tei’s and ring slings. Local sponsors supported the event with Ellen’s encouragement.

The team will be in contact with the event host winners in the next week to confirm preferance from the Petunia Pickle Bottom range and organise dispatch to nominated shipping addresses. Please don’t hesitate to contact us on community@babesinarms.com.au if you have any questions.

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Australia and New Zealand Babywearing Week – Flash Mob Entries

A number of Flash Mob events ran across Australia and New Zealand Babywearing Week. Each were eligible for the ‘Ergobaby Flash Mob’ Award. This award will be via a ‘People’s Choice’ vote. Each ‘Flash Mob’ will be posted on Aus/NZ Babywearing Week for review and votes cast for the most popular event.

To cast your vote simply nominate the event you think should win and provide your reason why in the comment box below. Voting CLOSES Friday, 23 November at 5.00 pm EST.

Rundle Mall Flashmob

With 59 participants signing on for this event, the Rundle Mall Flashmob was a roaring success. Hosted by Skye (who was due to give birth to her 4th baby that very week) participants met at the Rundle Mall Silver Balls then toured the city en masse before finishing at the Adelaide Botanical Gardens for a picnic lunch!

Nominated Charity group: Can Do 4 Kids

Semaphore Beach Babes

With 10 participants signing on for this event, Claire Boan orchestrated a choreographed dance in the centre of town. Their I Heart Babywearing badges were clearly visible and it was fun to see the reactions of onlookers in the video.

Nominated Charity group: Heartfelt

Ikea Invasion

Organized by Skye, the Ikea Invasion took place in Adelaide on October 12 with 33 registered participants.

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Nominated Charity group: Can Do 4 Kids

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Media Attention Award 2012 Announced

There were quite a number of very strong candidates for the Australia and New Zealand Babywearing Week Media Attention Award for 2012.

After countless hours of debate, a shortlist process and further review of entries, our panel made our decision earlier today.

With 5 newspaper articles, radio interview and countless social media mentions (including blogs), this years grant goes to…..

Bundaberg Walk in the Park!. Their nominated charity is Hear 4 Alana.

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Australia and New Zealand Babywearing Week – 2012 – Participant Sign On Sheet Individual Prizes

One participant from each eligible event* has been selected to receive a fabulous gift of a silicone pendant or bangle from MummaRocks and a set of BabyLegs. The chosen participants have been listed below and will also receive an email confirmation requesting their shipping information.

ONE participant will be selected across ALL the Australia and New Zealand Babywearing Week events to receive an Ergobaby carrier! (details to follow this week)

AP Lower North Shore                Rebekkah Moyle
Brisbane Swap Meet                   Emma Kendall
Bunbury Event                            Erin Phillips
Bundaberg                                  Michelle Van Deest
Canberra Parents                       Ange Telfel
Cowra                                          Kate Kerr
Darwin Babywearers                  Lisa Chaplin
Geelong                                       Rachel McBride
Glenelg Coffee Flashmob          Joanna Randell
Gold Coast                                 Rachel Stewart
Hobart Mums                             Virgina Leonard
Ikea Breakfast                           Jen Herman
Illawarra                                    Alecia Zoccoli
Kununurra                                 Jasmine Hokianga
Lithgow                                      Jackie Vogel
Midwest WA group                    Amber Green
Newcastle AP                            Krichelle Stamenoff
Newcastle Babywearers          May Fussel
North West Sydney                  Corinne Meers
Orange                                      Sarah Kable
Parent Prep                               Eliza Watters
Perth Babywearers Walk         Kristy Wall
Perth Family Picnic                  Charlee Stockden
Rundle Mall Flash Mob             Kelly Harpur
Safe Babywearing                    Mandi Ashcroft
Semaphore Beach Babes         Emma Denehy
Shoalhaven                               Patricia Hepburn
Tasmania Great Meet Up          Olivia McMahon
Tiny Footsteps Trivia                Tara Leatch
Tiny Footsteps Walk                  Kim McIntyre-Clarke
Wodonga event                         Abbie Dolny
Young                                        Beth Van Boast

If your event does not appear above, please speak to your event host and check that the participant sheet has been forwarded to us

*Eligible events are those that returned their participant sign on sheets and event images as detailed in the Participant Sign-on Sheet section.

**Please note, BabyLegs provided may be different than those in the image above. Only 1 MummaRocks item will be provided (either a pendant or bangle). The event participant pack will be awarded to ONE (1) participant per event on receipt of both the sign-on sheet from the event host and event images. The pack may take 3-4 weeks to arrive.

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The Largest Australia & New Zealand Babywearing Event 2012

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The Largest Australia & New Zealand Babywearing Group Award for 2012 goes to …..

Brisbane Babywearing Swap Meet. This event attracted 85 adult participants and many more children!

Organised by event hosts Heidi Casey & Georgia Brizuela their nominated charity is the Friends of the Birth Centre who will receive a $1000 grant.

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Traditional Carriers: The Native American Cradle Board

The cradle board is a Native American styled baby carrier typically made from cut flat pieces of wood or woven from flexible twigs such as willow. Moss, shredded bark, and animal fur was used for cushioning. The cradle board allowed mothers to continue working, whilst providing their babies with safety and security. The cradleboards were attached to the mother’s back straps from the shoulder or the head. For travel, cradleboards could be hung from the horse. It was quite customary for babies to be carried in this method right up to when the baby could walk.

From: Edward S Curtis’ The North American Indian

“My grandmas told me that you don’t decide when the child is going to give up the cradleboard, it’s the child that’s going to decide. They say the sooner that a child leaves or pushes away the cradleboard and doesn’t want to use it—that means they’re going to mature a lot faster.” —Maynard WhiteOwl Lavadour

I learned to make these cradleboards by watching Mom, by helping her or helping my grandmother. Altogether I’ve made three sizes—infant, medium, and large. In my family, all the relatives that I know of kept their babies in boards. They like their boards. They want to stay in them and sleep in them.” —Agnes Goudy Lopez

“When you know of a child being born, then you prepare. You start making their clothes. We get the baby boards ready, and we have to keep to tradition. When a baby board is made, it has to be made in a day. You begin at the break of day and it has to be done before evening so the child will grow up to be a good person.” —Sophie George

(Excerpts taken from Native American Birthing Traditions, The Oregon Historical Society)

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Traditional Carriers: African Kanga

The traditional African Kanga is a beauty behold. These sarongs (as a kanga has a multidude of uses) originated from the slave trade of the late 1800s where black dyed kaniki were worn to identify the lowly status of the wearer. When freed, the former slaves rejoiced in their freedom by wearing colourful sarongs made from cotton – a fiber that was generally only worn by the rich.

From here the Kanga evolved had has become a significant culture piece. It can be used as a communication piece, conveying messages to family and community. Traditionally, a first time mother is presented with a kanga from her husband to celebrate her fertility and her baby is wrapped in a soft cotton kanga.

The Kanga is very versitile and is used for a multitude of purposes including as a baby carrier utilising a torso back carry (the baby is never carried on front). The baby is supported by the upper body of the wearer rather than the shoulders, the weight being distributed across the middle of the back and onto the hips.

Simply a rectangular piece of fabric, when used as a carrier the Kanga is a quick carry to adopt with practice, but can be a little tricky to start with…so practice, practice, practice (on either a soft surface and/or with a support person).


This video was shot in Tobre (Benin) before an immunization session.

 

 

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Traditional Carriers: Amauti

The large-hooded Amauti garment, worn by Inuit women, is unique. The parka’s traditional design is functional, allowing the child to be carried in the same garment as the parent offering protection and safety from the harsh Arctic climate, as well as beauty – and beautiful these traditional carriers are!

The design and look of an Amauti was passed on from generation to generation, with particular looks dependant on the area one was from. Various materials were used dependant on availability and included seal skin and caribou. Measurements were by hand and custom fitted to the mother. Like the Ergobaby carrier back position, the baby Inuit was carried with their stomach to mother’s back and their knees were bent. The Amauti was secured around the mother’s waist to prevent the child from slipping down. The weight of the child was carried across the shoulders of the garment although the weight was typically re-distributed by two more ties which form a “v” from the collar bone, with the base secured by the tie at the waist. The shoulders of the carrier were roomy enough for the mother to easily move her child forward to breastfeed when needed. This particular form of carry allowed the mother to be in constant contact with her infant, even enabling her to determine when the child needed to toilet! (although an emergency nappy of moss was kept at the bottom of the Amauti in case of emergencies!).

Library of Congress Prints and Photographs, Photograph by Lomen Bros., 1906

Many of the traditional methods of Amauti production were beginning to fade into history until recently. The first national consultation with Inuit women in Canada on the issues of protecting their cultural property, traditional knowledge and intellectual property rights was held in 2001. It was also the culmination of several years of research and development. Please find attached the final report here with some glorious images of the produced results.

Eastern Arctic Inuit: Nunavimiut (1890-1897) Made from Seal fur, dog fur, sinew. Kept at McCord Museum